Process Safety Management

Training Modules

Each module is a stand-alone package or can be taken in combination aligned to an individual’s job role and function. Guidance and advice can be provided on the packages which best suit specific roles such and production managers and supervisor, technical and maintenance staff, senior managers and executives and most critically, front line operational staff.

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Competence Management

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Course Format:

Each module consists of the following options:

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Power point slide presentation.

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Narrated slides as a video presentation.

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A self-assessment exercise at the end of the module.

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A script for the slides to be presented by in house trainer.

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This modular course is based on best practice in process safety management. It incorporates all the key features of the Energy Institute’s Process Safety Management framework – presented in a simple to follow sequence of key modules.

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  • 1: Introduction to Process Safety £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    This introductory session covers the basic concepts of process safety and outlines a systematic process safety management model. We explore process safety hazards, understanding risk and provide an easy-to-understand explanation of the difference between conventional occupational health and safety and process safety to make sure you fully grasp the concept of process safety.

    The session provides practical examples of hazardous operations and conditions to put the concepts of process safety into context within workplaces. The module introduces the concept of a process safety hazard and how such hazards differ from conventional occupational health and safety hazards. This is to provide a fundamental way of looking for and understanding common process safety hazards within the workplace.

    Process safety risk is covered next as the building block to identify process safety controls to safeguard against harm from process safety hazards.

    The module concludes with an introduction to process safety management as a key requirement to managing risks and avoiding catastrophic events.

    Intended audience:

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    This module is suitable for those new to process safety with no previous experience in the subject. It’s a great introduction to the concepts of process safety and how this differs from occupational health and safety systems. The module can be used as an induction to process safety for new recruits or contractors who need a basic understanding of process safety.

  • 2: Hazard Identification £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    This first full module builds on the basic concepts of process safety covered in the introductory session to set out the first building block of a process safety management system – Hazard Identification.

    The module covers the minimum expectations of a hazard identification system and outlines the fundamental properties of process safety hazards. It deals with how the nature and extent of hazards within certain industries can, if not carefully managed, lead to catastrophic accidents, with a case study to illustrate the importance of effective hazard identification and what can go wrong if this is neglected. A core component of the module is hazard scenario mapping – this introduces the idea of mapping-out the possible causes of an incident and then considering the potential consequences within the context of the workplace where the hazards are present. The moule outlines a step-by-step guide, using an example of a fuel terminal site, to produce a hazard profile for the facility by setting out the key major hazard scenarios and describing the circumstances which could lead to a loss of containment and the possible harmful consequences.

    The training stresses why and how hazard identification is the starting point for risk assessment because understanding the nature of the hazards present is an essential input to successful risk assessment.

    The case study in this module is the ammonium nitrate explosion in West Texas, USA, in 2013.

    Finally, at the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Anyone involved in risk assessment and planning safe systems of work.

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    Safety teams.

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    Anyone involved in incident investigations.

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    Project managers.

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    Facility managers.

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    Maintenance managers.

  • 3: Risk Assessment £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    This second module follows on from Hazard Identification and forms the pivotal point for determining or reviewing the control measures needed to protect against process safety hazards. Control and mitigation measures must be able to reduce the risk of a major incident to as low as reasonably practicable, ALARP, at all times hazards are present.

    The module covers the minimum expectations of a risk assessment system and outlines the key methodologies for an effective assessment of process safety risks. A step-by-step approach is outlined starting with the concept of risk profiling, determining failure modes which could lead to a loss of containment and outlining incident consequence modelling using a qualitative approach. An overview is provided of differing risk assessment methodologies from HAZOP, Layers of Protection Analysis, Human Reliability analysis and the use of Bow Tie barrier analysis to bring the findings from each type of risk assessment under a single format.

    The function of risk assessment in determining the plant design, setting and managing operational parameters and implementing a risk-based asset management programme is emphasised. The module ends with a discussion about risk tolerability, the concept of ALARP and shows why when hazardous substances are present in a facility that risk can never be zero.

    The case study within the module is the fire and explosion at BP Texas City Refinery 2005.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Anyone involved in risk assessment and planning safe systems of work, including PTW, Management of Change & preparing method statements.

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    Safety teams.

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    Project managers.

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    Facility managers.

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    Maintenance managers.

  • 4: Plant Design £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    This module covers the first outcome of risk assessment which is to ensure that the design of process plant and equipment can withstand the challenges to integrity which may occur during the operation of the plant.

    The training outlines how the results of risk assessment should be used to determine the 'basis of safety' required to prevent a catastrophic incident and then to design, construct, and commission the facility to ensure that the risk reduction / mitigation objectives are effectively implemented. The module covers the need for accurate information and records of the design specification, the rationale for selecting safeguards, control systems and design and how this information should be made available to those who operate and maintain the plant and equipment.

    Safe design and resilience to failure is based on the selection of materials of construction and configuration of equipment taking account of the expected failure modes which can affect them.

    The module also covers the key design objectives for process plant, safe isolation requirements and how plant design requires a life cycle approach.

    The case study within the module is the fire and explosion at Texaco Milford Haven refinery in 1994.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Anyone involved in the design, selection or modification of process plant and equipment.

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    Safety teams.

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    Project managers.

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    Facility managers.

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    Maintenance managers.

  • 5: Operational Parameters £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    Once the primary containment system design is determined the next stage in process safety management is to ensure that the process conditions (operational parameters) are always kept within safe limits when the plant is started up, operated or shut down.

    This module covers the setting of safety margins for process conditions and the design of instrumented safety systems, including instrument and alarm systems. Selecting and ensuring the performance requirements (safety integrity levels) for instrumented controls systems is outlined. A brief description of functional safety proof testing is covered. The importance of human factors in the design of safety instrumented systems is explained.

    The module provides a step by step worked example of how to set safe operational parameters for a high hazard installation.

    Finally, issues relating to cyber security for safety instrumented systems are set out.

    The case study within the module is the fire and explosion at BP Texas City Refinery in 2005.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Anyone involved in designing or maintaining instrumented safety systems.

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    Operational shift leaders and managers.

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    Safety teams.

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    Project managers.

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    Designers.

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    Asset managers.

  • 6: Asset Management £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    Asset Integrity programmes ensure the integrity and performance of plant, equipment, sensors, and alarms which maintain the ‘basis of safety’ when hazardous substances or conditions are present.

    The module outlines the essential requirements of a risk-based asset integrity programme where inspection and maintenance programmes reflect the degradation modes of plant and equipment. These are derived from the challenges to integrity analysis during risk assessment and additionally takes account of operational experience.

    Definitions of safety critical plant and equipment are outlined as well as the need to identify safety critical spares and include structural elements within an asset integrity programme.

    The case studies in this module are the fire and explosion at BP Texas City refinery and the US Tesoro Anacortes refinery in 2010.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Anyone involved in designing or maintaining process plant and equipment.

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    Maintenance contractors.

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    Safety teams.

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    Project managers.

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    Designers.

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    Asset managers.

  • 7: Operational Procedures £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    Providing clear and concise information on safe systems of work to people who operate and maintain hazardous plant and equipment is essential. This area of process safety management often causes difficulty within organisations where information overload and confusion often occur. When things go wrong, operators are often blamed for not following the procedure.

    This module outlines the key principles essential to developing information and instructions. It introduces the concept of safety critical tasks for which clear procedures are required.

    The training stresses that operational procedures are an essential form of risk communication and that they must help people to undertake safety critical tasks correctly.

    The module covers a simple framework and format that operational procedures should follow to reduce the chance of human error.

    Asset Integrity programmes ensure the integrity and performance of plant, equipment, sensors, and alarms needed to always maintain the ‘basis of safety’ when hazardous substances or conditions are present.

    The case study in this module is the Bayer Crop Science explosion in 2008.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Anyone involved in producing or reviewing safe operating procedures or safety instructions.

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    Team leaders and managers.

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    Safety teams.

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    People leading accident and incident investigations.

  • 8: Operational Control £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    It is essential to ensure that the plant and processes are operated and maintained in a safe condition and sufficient safety margins are maintained, that the plant integrity is not degraded during start-up or operation and that the plant and processes can be safely shut down or brought under control in an emergency.

    This module outlines the importance of always being in control of hazardous processes. To achieve this there needs to be a clear description of what effective control looks like. This definition of the safety parameters needs to be shared and understood by everyone involved in operating and maintaining the plant.

    Importantly, the module stresses that the actions to take, should control be lost, to be clearly set out and operators should train on these emergency actions.

    The importance of an effective shift handover (of control) is covered as well as the need for an effective hand back system following any outage or maintenance actions.

    The case study in this module are the fire and explosion at BP Texas City refinery in 2005.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Anyone involved in maintaining control of hazardous processes.

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    Team leaders and managers.

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    Safety teams.

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    People leading accident and incident investigations.

  • 9: Competence Management £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    It is essential to ensure that the plant and processes are operated and maintained in a safe condition and sufficient safety margins are maintained, that the plant integrity is not degraded during start-up or operation and that the plant and processes can be safely shut down or brought under control in an emergency.

    This module outlines the importance of always being in control of hazardous processes. To achieve this there needs to be a clear description of what effective control looks like. This definition of the safety parameters needs to be shared and understood by everyone involved in operating and maintaining the plant.

    Importantly, the module stresses that the actions to take, should control be lost, to be clearly set out and operators should train on these emergency actions.

    The importance of an effective shift handover (of control) is covered as well as the need for an effective hand back system following any outage or maintenance actions.

    The case study in this module are the fire and explosion at BP Texas City refinery in 2005.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Anyone involved in maintaining control of hazardous processes.

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    Team leaders and managers.

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    Safety teams.

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    People leading accident and incident investigations.

  • 10: Management of Contractors £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    Work undertaken by third parties and contractors on major hazard facilities has two main process safety considerations. Contractors should be protected from harm from hazardous substances and processes and the work of contractors should not degrade the integrity of process plant and equipment or any associated safety control systems.

    The module sets the importance of contractors and third parties who fulfil a process safety role or function having the right competence and sufficient knowledge and information about the process safety risks to undertake their work safely and without degrading the integrity of the plant and process. It covers the selection of contractors based on process safety competence.

    The training outlines the importance of work control using risk assessments and method statements as well as the need for careful monitoring of work by contractors and of the process safety performance of the contracting company.

    The case study in this module is the fire and explosion at the Chevron Pembroke refinery in 2011.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Staff involved in contractor procurement.

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    Staff involved in managing or supervising contractors.

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    Safety teams.

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    Project managers.

  • 11: Permit to Work £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    A permit to work, PTW, system is a ‘permissioning’ system for high-risk work involving hazardous substances or conditions. A PTW system is one of the most widespread process safety controls within the major hazard sector and yet these systems often fail leading to major accidents and serious injuries.

    This module sets out the basic principles of any PTW system and then goes on to highlight how PTW systems commonly fail so that common problems can be avoided. The session explains why a PTW is a risk communication tool rather than simply a certificate or form of consent for the work to be undertaken.

    The importance of effective plant and equipment isolation within a permit system is outlined and the module covers how to successfully monitor the work as it’sundertaken. Permit suspension and hand back are also covered.

    The case study in this module is the Piper Alpha fire and explosion in 1988.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Staff involved in management of high-risk work.

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    Staff involved in issuing, working with or supervising PTW.

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    Safety teams.

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    Project managers.

  • 12: Management of Change £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    Few major hazard installations remain unaltered during their lifetime and so an effective management of change, MoC, system is essential to ensure that the integrity of the plant and safety control systems is not degraded or compromised by a change.

    Management of change systems can prove problematic either due to their complicated nature or because people bypass the MOC arrangements and make a change without seeking permission or assessing the risks.

    This module outlines the key principle of a management of change system and explores why they so often fail. A step-by-step guide to an effective MoC is presented with a clear explanation of each type of change covered such as a technical change, operational parameters change, procedural change and organisational change. Like for like changes and temporary changes are covered as well as the need to validate that the change has been undertaken in accordance with the approval before any process plant or equipment is brought back into service.

    The case study in this module is the Flixborough explosion in 1974.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Staff involved in the management of change, requesting or approving change.

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    Safety teams.

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    Project managers.

  • 13: Emergency Arrangements £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    The plans and arrangements to respond to a major incident must be tailored to the range of major hazard scenarios which could occur on site. This module sets out the key principles of emergency response arrangements to ensure that all plant and processes can be safely and effectively shut down and controlled, people are effectively evacuated, ensure on-site and external emergency responders have sufficient information, resources, support, and capacity to deal with all reasonably foreseeable emergency situations.

    The module covers emergency planning, on site response and decision making as well as setting out effective liaison arrangements with offsite responders.

    The case study in this module is the Sandoz Chemical spill in Basel Switzerland in 1986.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Staff involved in preparing and responding to major incidents.

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    Safety teams.

  • 14: Monitor, Measure and Review £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    All safety systems deteriorate over time. Process safety management is about managing low frequency high impact events and so careful monitoring of performance to detect early signs of failure to control risks is essential. The module outlines the three main ways of monitoring and measuring process safety performance using accident and incident investigation, setting key process safety indicators, KPIs and routine and systematic process safety auditing.

    Process safety incident investigation relies on having a clear definition of a process safety incident and a systematic way of identifying the immediate and underlying causes. The module outlines the key principles of process safety incident investigation and how to link the findings to failures in process safety management systems.

    The session also covers the essential requirements of setting process safety KPIs to provide proactive information on the performance of each element of the PSM system. A simple definition of leading and lagging indicators is provided and how to focus on the most meaningful measures of control of major hazard risk is set out.

    Like incident investigation, process safety auditing is a gap analysis against the expected policies and procedures required for an effective process safety management system. The module sets out the essential attributes of a PSM audit and how to effectively collect evidence from which to form conclusions.

    All types of performance monitoring and measuring has a single purpose and that is to identify and implement improvements and so the Module concludes with the essential need for senior managers to review and act on findings.

    The case study in this module is the dust explosion at the Imperial Sugar Company, Georgia, USA in 2008.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Asset and facility managers, senior executives.

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    Safety teams.

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    Staff involved in management investigation of incidents, audits and reporting performance using KPIs.

  • 15: Leadership and Culture £35.00

    Module synopsis:

    Effective process safety leadership ensures that priorities and strategies for effective risk management are established, championed and implemented. The role of leaders in securing sufficient resources for sustainable risk management is outlined in this module.

    The session explains the importance of business decisions being made in the light of the implications for risk management and that stakeholders are informed and engaged on the performance of the business in relation to risk management.

    An outline of the key attributes of effective process safety leadership is set out alongside a practical model of process safety leadership for senior management teams.

    The module explains how process safety leadership influences the prevailing safety culture within an organisation and how this can be both positive and negative.

    The case studies in this module are the explosions at Buncefield in the UK, BP Texas City refinery in the US and the Esso Longford gas explosion in South Australia.

    At the end of the module there is a short self-assessment exercise.

    Intended audience:

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    Board members, managers, executives, and team leaders from all parts of an organisation within the major hazard sector.